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Planet Alpha Review: Cosmic Platforming

Planet Alpha Review: Cosmic Platforming

Science Fiction has always been one of my favorite genres in media. When I saw Planet Alpha screenshots, I was instantly intrigued, having grown up playing mostly platformers. Planet Alpha seemed like it would be something I needed to try out. The closest of the genre I can compare this to is Inside and Abe’s Odyssey. Maybe a combined version of the two. While you can’t directly kill the enemies, you can use traps or night/day shifting to make time work against them. While only really able to move left or right, the perspective and interaction within three dimensions are still present. The game is fairly short, and you’re able to complete it within a sitting if you decided to do so. You’ll constantly be dying, but there are checkpoints everywhere. You can keep failing, but will usually be placed right before the area you failed in. It’s mostly easy, but at the same time avoids being a pushover. Some spots can be very difficult because you aren’t sure what to do or how to avoid certain enemies. There is a weak plot, but I wasn’t sure if I didn’t like it because there wasn’t one, or because I didn’t get it. Time to “jump” to what I liked most.

Here’s what I liked:
The Planet— From the start, you’ll realize you’re on a beautiful planet that’s extremely dangerous. Besides a lush environment filled with extraordinary wildlife, there are also mean robots that shoot at you with lasers. You’ll feel very small on this planet. The huge almost dinosaur looking creatures are mostly in the background but do interact with you somewhat (in good and bad ways). They can destroy your robot foes, or you if you get in their way. It’s like you’re in the middle of a war at times, where you’re just trying to pass through while death surrounds you. I also love how much depth there is with the landscape. Even though you’re in a side-scrolling game, the world often gets in your line of sight. This can help with enemies trying to get you and adds a bit of problem-solving to use your surroundings to block the view of enemies or even their attacks. I admire the creative use of science fiction.

Time Shifting — You’re able to shift time from day to night. It adds a lot more thought and flavor which puts a nice shine to the chapters. There are quite a few times that you will need to adjust the time of day. You can make mushrooms grow to jump onto, or exotic plants to raise from the ground to help you conceal yourself from the robotic enemies. There is a use of it for certain puzzles too, allowing you to align certain things from the solar system. It really brought the environment to life.
Movement— Accuracy can be difficult for a platformer to get right. Alpha Planet has done it right. The movement is excellent. Times I thought maybe I wouldn’t make a jump; I did, barely hanging on for life and then pulling myself up again. The best use of jumping is within the other dimension after going through a portal (at least I think it’s another dimension). The physics are impressive and fun. Many games fail to make jumping with low gravity feel good. It’s hard to describe how well done it is in Planet Alpha, you really just have to try it to understand how well they nailed it. The momentum from a moving block that propels you forward in a high velocity is perfection.

Here’s what I didn’t like:
Being Blocked— Unfortunately, not everything seems to have been done well with the physics. There are times an enemy moves to a spot they can’t attack you, but you can’t progress through them. At that point you just want to die, trying everything to push them or let them hit you. It’s very annoying when this happens. I wish I could say this only happened once. Besides enemies, sometimes moving objects that allow you to jump on them actually get stuck. You can’t move them in either direction if this happens. There is no quick reload checkpoint option, so you’ll have to exit or get yourself killed in order to restart. It stood out to me as being a glitch, but the programming of the enemies stopping in certain areas seems to be the real issue.
No Climax — No narrative exists, and you find yourself moving from checkpoint to checkpoint without much explanation of what is going on. You have somewhat of an idea, but after you finish the game, you might not feel like anything really happened. There is also no climax, and each area could have been played in any order. The chapters seamlessly blend together, but they also offer no sense of progress. You can complete the game in one sitting. Even if the goal was to let the player create their own thoughts on the story in an artistic way of silence, then it was a missed goal.

Wrap-up
Gorgeous design quality, accurate controls and interesting use of shifting the time of day make Planet Alpha stand out amongst recent platform based games. It has quick load times, forgiving checkpoints and can actually be quite challenging in a lot of areas. It’s fairly short, but I believe the time spent is very enjoyable. I do wish there was a better soundtrack. At first, I thought there was no music at all, but I realized my volume was a little bit low. I didn’t really care for the music because I don’t feel it was exciting. It wasn’t bad, but it didn’t keep up with the action happening. Either way, it didn’t have any real weight on to how I felt about the game overall. While there is a little confusion with the story and no additional content beyond beating it, I believe the outcome of this title resulted in a pretty good experience.
Score: Highly Recommended

Planet Alpha was published by Team 17 and developed by Planet Alpha ApS on Xbox One. It was released on September 4, 2018, for $19.99. A copy was provided by the publisher for review purposes.

Sinner Sacrifice for Redemption Review: Difficult but no depth

Sinner Sacrifice for Redemption Review: Difficult but no depth

 There’s a certain cult following when it comes to games that are known to be extremely difficult. Maybe it’s the sense of pride when mastering them, or the never-ending pressure every single battle brings you. You won’t be rolling through Sinner like it’s a town you’re passing through on a road trip. Dark Souls has set a tone for making challenging bosses fun. Sinner has used a similar recipe but has removed the RPG elements as well as any exploration. Instead, it’s basically an arena-style boss rush. You can pick any boss you’d like first, sacrificing something to face them. Once you have won, you will not get your sacrifice back. You can lose attack damage, equipment, armor, etc. This adds a strategic balancing act as you discover what order works best for your fighting style. If you find some fights too difficult, you may go retrieve a sacrifice to help, but you will have to beat that boss again later. The goal is to unlock a final boss to beat, but only after you’ve beaten the first seven.

Here’s what I liked:
Presentation — From the music to the design, the game is presented quite beautifully. Every encounter feels different and looks unique. The cutscenes displayed are sharp and well done. There is a good use of a blurring effect to highlight distance and evasion. The abilities of the bosses look impressive as well. From fire to lightning, it all seems smooth and accurate. Each sin has a lot of different attacks which make memorization difficult but extremely important. My favorite effect is the reflection from the moon when fighting Lust. She starts off standing in it and then rushes towards you when you get close. Her attacks start to freeze you, and the frost can be seen on the hero. You can use an item on your sword that makes it burst into flames, and it makes you feel powerful (but you’re not, you’re still about to die). The effects brighten an otherwise dull atmosphere.

Deadly Sins — There is something fascinating about the Cardinal Sins. Sinner uses them as a storyline. Your hero is trying to redeem the sins of the world by conquering bosses based on them. Each boss has a short yet to the point scene to explain who you’re about to fight, presented in an artistic style. This theme is portrayed quite well and makes a lot of sense. It’s instantly appreciated. There have been a few other titles that based their stories on such evils. Dante’s Inferno, for example, had its levels correspond to the sins. The vibe I got while playing Sinner was of a gothic nature, and it’s one of my favorite themes.
Here’s what I didn’t like:
Hit boxes — This will be your actual foe. While you can seemingly be hit randomly without explanation after dodging, you also will often miss when attacking. Watching your sword skim the enemy yet wield no effect can be disappointing. Lust can shoot arrows at you, and even after dodging them perfectly, you’ll suddenly be hit well after the animation has happened. You’ll be hitting the retry button more often than hitting the boss! It makes for some very awkward feeling gameplay.

One hit death — There are some attacks from your enemies that instantly kill you. So much damage in fact that you’re dead even before your health bar shows it. Besides that, you have to worry about falling off a cliff constantly. Playing Wrath, I often died by being knocked out of bounds or falling as I was walking away. In fact, most of your deaths will likely occur when you had full health. It seems like a cheap trick to make the game even more difficult.
No customization — Your hero is bland. You can’t do anything to make him look cool. You get no option to customize anything at all. Maybe I want my sword power to be frost instead of flame. You’re given zero option to make your experience any different besides your choice in sacrifices. I would have loved getting rewards from bosses that were random, like different helmets or gear. Instead, the only thing you can do is beat the game to get a new weapon.
What now? — While keeping things simple was likely the goal, it’s a real shame there is nothing exciting about fighting the bosses again after beating them. In fact, many will be frustrated when having to take back a sacrifice and fight one that was already difficult. I beat Lust first and didn’t think the battle was too difficult. After progressing through more fights, I decided to take back my sacrifice to help with other battles. I went back to defeat her again, but this time I suddenly had a much harder time. It almost seemed unfair. Even if that’s the point, it didn’t sit well with me. I love progression and feeling accomplished, but I didn’t even want to bother trying again. It’s like being placed back a step, and the only enjoyment I had was defeating a boss I hadn’t beaten yet. Nothing was really compelling me to continue playing. I got no rewards besides increased health, which was nullified by the fact that everything was becoming harder. I found myself sitting in the world where you choose what boss to fight, not really wanting to continue on. I lost all interest very quickly.

Wrap-up
Besides a unique concept and beautiful presentation, Sinner falls short on content and playability. You never care about your hero and the bosses can be extremely frustrating. With no difficulty option, you’re forced into an uphill battle against the bosses. You aren’t offered any hints on how the world works, and you’ll be often stuck wondering what to do next. I enjoyed what I played, but it got stale very quickly. I felt no reason to continue my journey after beating most of the sins. When you feel like you are progressing things only to have to take back your sacrifice to fight another boss, you just never think you’re going to accomplish anything. I highly suggest trying this on Game Pass if you have it. There will be some die-hard fans who love the challenge, but I am not among those courageous perfectionists.
Score: Reader’s Choice

Sinner: Sacrifice for Redemption was published by Another Indie and developed by Dark Star on Xbox One. It was released on October 18, 2018, for $18.99. A copy was provided by the publisher for review purposes.

ADIOS Amigos review: estoy en espacio

ADIOS Amigos review: estoy en espacio

Space travel is a fickle thing. For something that requires massive machinery and high-powered rockets, a successful mission relies on intense precision. Years of scientific progress and intense training go into a single trip off Earth. There is no room for error as failure almost ensures death – be it a quick one from a fiery explosion, or a slow suffocation in the cold vacuum of space. Landing on a foreign celestial body is the most delicate procedure of them all, where making a careful micro-adjustment could be the difference between a successful touchdown and disaster. Yet here I am, thrashing my pod uncontrollably around an unknown planet. The galaxy is an unforgiving place filled with undiscovered beauty, and it’s become apparent my destiny is to crash into every little piece of it.

Here’s what I liked:
Wanna go home – ADIOS Amigos is a space-faring roguelike, but one that’s forgiving enough to have a few checkpoints in its campaign. In order to return to your home planet, you need to travel through a series of solar systems, gathering the materials required to complete your trip. The number of systems you need to pass through will always be the same, but each one is randomly generated down to the smallest bit of space junk. Each level gives you entire planets to explore, alien life forms to discover and a whole lot of asteroids to avoid, all orbiting around a giant central mass. You’re given free rein to explore to your heart’s content, whether it be flying around in your spaceship or going on a zero-g spacewalk. Obviously staying in the tin can is the smart way to go, as it’s vastly superior at travel and has a useful tow cable to boot. You’ll mostly be leaving the safety of your ship after it’s touched down on an alien planet. These planets are often ripe with resources only reachable on foot, changing the game from a space flight simulator to a 2D Super Mario Galaxy. Your little guy only has a flashlight and a jetpack with limited power, so if danger arises don’t expect to fight back. The best you can do is pick up and throw objects, but that’s more effective for collection than self-defense.
Let’s go to space – Reaching your ultimate goal relies on gathering two main resources: discoveries and energy. Discoveries are points of interest that grant you research points upon approaching, which are used to power the warp drive that takes you to the next system. These are usually large objects of note, from man-made space debris to terrestrial alien life forms, highlighted by a pulsating glow. Energy, on the other hand, is the moment-to-moment fuel used to keep your ship functioning. Not only does it power the thrusters, but it’s also used to repair the ship and heal the pilot. This fuel is a bit trickier to collect, mostly gathered through small materials that need to be carried to the ship by hand. Gathering discoveries is important, but the true measure of success is efficient fuel consumption. This means mitigating as much damage as possible, while also avoiding overusing the rocket. So much of your success boils down to this single resource, making the micromanagement of your survival easy to understand yet incredibly tense.
The best at space – What makes the game work is just how much it feels like space without being an over-complicated simulator. Flying your ship is as simple as pointing in a direction and hitting the gas. Being in a friction-less vacuum, your biggest obstacle is overcoming your own momentum; your ship may rotate on a dime, but you’re not changing directions unless you go full force on the thrust. Conserving energy is of high importance, so becoming skilled at drifting through the cosmos with minimal engine use is key. The game absolutely nails the feeling of being in zero gravity, whether it be deftly navigating a ship through an asteroid field or kicking off walls inside an abandoned space station. The game does gravity great as well, as the larger bodies pull on everything around them with their own variable strength. You’re really going to notice it on foot; some planets are heavy enough to make carrying small objects a struggle, while others are so light one jump will send you so high you literally won’t come back down. Every solar system is a self-contained physics-based sandbox, where every single object obliges to the laws of momentum and gravity. If an asteroid gets too close to a planet you’re on, get ready to dodge a meteor. Even the planets, whose orbits may at first appear fixed, are in equilibrium with their sun’s pull and in extreme circumstances can be thrown off course to disastrous results.

Here’s what I didn’t like:
Better buy a telescope – Viewing space travel is a matter of shifting perspectives and scales, which makes perfecting the camera a tricky needle to thread. The game automatically zooms in and out based on your proximity to planets or similarly major objects, buts lets you manually control the zoom if need be. You’re gonna need those controls too, as the game doesn’t automatically adjust for everything that comes your way, like an asteroid field. You don’t get free will over the zoom either; you’re merely cycling through a couple presets, and even then you’re locked out of a few while on foot. At greater distances your ship is replaced with a giant arrow, which is helpful for gathering your surroundings but is only functional when there’s absolutely nothing else around you. Interstellar camerawork is not ideal, but it’s at its worst when approaching a planet. The game treats exploring open space similar to the classic Asteroids, whereas terrestrial exploration is treated as a sidescroller where your character is always appears to be on top of a world that rotates under their feet. The transition between the two is messy, to say the least. If you’re not approaching a planet from the top, the sudden shift of perspective when you break atmosphere will give you whiplash. Mix that in with the zooming that occurs during the process, and touching down becomes a huge issue; I’ve crash landed or missed the ground completely more times than I can count.
Too big – For a game with roguelike tendencies, it fails to keep itself feeling new and interesting. This comes down to the planets more than anything else – while they’re varied in art style and layout, they’re all way too similar. A couple of hills or pillars, a few discoveries, and a smattering of fuel hidden beneath movable boulders. These worlds never feel like more than an uninteresting rocky landscape sprinkled with random items. Maybe there’s some hazards or extreme weather conditions to slow you down, or some odd life forms haphazardly running around to annoy you, but there’s never enough to make a planet truly stand out. They’re too small to have room for anything extremely different, making each terrestrial excursion quick and unmemorable.
Space cops – There’s nothing wrong with a game starting with a tutorial, especially one as complex as ADIOS Amigos, but the game really should have stopped there. In the early goings the game unlocks a new tutorial after every few runs, each one teaching a different mechanic. The problem is that these aren’t new mechanics — they’ve been in the game since the beginning and you’ve most likely used them already. The game even has button prompts to tell you when to use them in normal gameplay, so it’d be hard to be completely unaware of them. When a new tutorial is unlocked, it’s mandatory to complete before re-entering the game proper. Each one only takes a minute or two, but to regularly be forced into these redundant lessons is a huge annoyance.

Wrap-up:
There were moments during ADIOS Amigos that I got extremely bored, going through the motions of gathering materials and jumping to hyperspace with little investment. But every time I was gonna quit out of boredom, something amazing happened. A rogue asteroid shattered a space station while I was inside it. A giant space jellyfish kidnapped my parked ship while I was on the other side of the planet. I inadvertently hooked an alien craft who graciously carried me between planets. These random occurrences injected much-needed life-or-death intensity and are the epitome of this intergalactic sandbox, but in my experiences the game was more often too static for its own good. In a way the game is less about the worlds it creates and more about the insanity that could potentially happen — perhaps why they allowed for up to four astronauts playing together. Despite my grievances I enjoyed the game: it’s a solid, beautiful space exploration game — but one with too much space in between the good parts (pun intended).
Score: Reader’s Choice
ADIOS Amigos was developed and published by Cosmic Picnic. It was released September 12, 2018 for $19.99. A copy was provided for review purposes.

Hollow Knight Review – The Darkest of Souls

Hollow Knight Review – The Darkest of Souls

Published & developed by Australian studio Team Cherry, Hollow Knight is a Metroidvania 2D side-scroller that borrows its dark, macabre style from games like Dark Souls, while attempting to give the genre a unique spin of its own.
You control an insect-like knight, the Hollow Knight, as they embark upon on a quest to uncover the many secrets of the ancient Hallownest Kingdom, overrun with sick inhabitants & mystery. The further you venture into the kingdom, the more knee-deep in enemies you’ll become as you try to uncover the obscure story being told & find out why the Knight’s existence is tied to the long-dead kingdom.

Here’s what I liked:
Deep Lore – At a surface level, the narrative of Hollow Knight is fairly light & nonexistent. There are NPC’s scattered around the areas you explore, but unless you dig deeper, pay attention & connect the dots, you won’t be able to see the larger picture being painted. This method of storytelling actually works in the game’s favor, as it meshes neatly with the theme of exploration in the gameplay itself. With each area you visit, each NPC you speak to, or each item you come across – the deeper your understanding of the story will become. You’ll find yourself realizing that characters you came across earlier while exploring, who were thought to be insignificant, are actually rather important & central to the narrative. Thanks to the many content updates, there are also five endings to achieve that expand some details of the story (a few of those endings require the player to complete very obscure tasks to unlock them, so it’s wise to always be on the lookout for important items & pay attention to NPC dialogue). Hollow Knight rewards intuitiveness & those who seek to uncover the deeper elements at play.
Art Style – Much like every other aspect of Hollow Knight the art style is dripping in macabre hues of blue & grey. Team Cherry utilized the Unity software by creating 2D objects & placing them in a 3D map which allows for the final product to really pop & give depth to the player while they’re exploring the environments. Although dark & slightly haunting, the actual character style the team decided to go with is oddly cute & friendly. Being that they’re insect-like figures in a Romanesque goth setting, the end result is a potent juxtaposition of endearing & eerily foreboding. You’re not sectioned-off to one location in the game either – without spoiling anything, you’ll visit a wide array of areas that allow the game’s beautiful art style to truly shine & be appreciated.

Refined Controls – Most of the gameplay boils down to just pressing the attack button & jumping around obstacles in the environment, but Hollow Knight features some of the most responsive controls in a 2D side-scroller. At the start, the Knight is armed with a large nail, & with each swing that you connect to an enemy’s face,  you’ll feel a satisfying thump. The combat itself, while bare-bones, is refined with a sense of immediacy in your physical actions. Even through the platforming, each jump that you successfully land feels weighted down. You aren’t plagued with a sense of floating like some other titles in the genre. Team Cherry did a phenomenal job at making the Knight feel grounded & connected to the world. On top of the controls being handled expertly, perhaps the best aspect of the combat itself is the way in which you regain health. You can only heal yourself through the use of your magic gauge, & the only way to refill that magic gauge is to land successful hits on enemies. This clever design choice encourages you to play aggressively & get right back into the fight, always staying on the offensive – similar in execution to the PS4 title Bloodborne. The combat has the perfect pick-up-and-play nature while still feeling rewarding to master.
Meaningful Design – There a very few tutorials in Hollow Knight. This is another design decision by Team Cherry that works in the game’s favor, as each acquisition of typically mundane items such as a simple map, or the ability to fast travel are significant & feel monumental in your journey. It requires you to pay careful attention, otherwise you may never even acquire a map, as doing so is entirely optional, making the game way more difficult. There’s no hand-holding to be found here, your intelligence is respected & your resolute will to venture forth, exploring Hallownest at every turn without aid, is slowly rewarded. The game is also littered with mini-bosses throughout, each offering a unique optional challenge. Most of the fun from these encounters come from learning their attack patterns & figuring out how to defeat them. Following the theme of very few tutorials, these bosses cleverly foreshadow their attacks & allow for you to learn their weaknesses through intricate means – it forces you to watch their movements closely so that you can dodge their attacks & land a damaging blow.

Here’s what I didn’t like:
Uneven Pacing – Hollow Knight even in all of its greatness can feel back-loaded with the pacing. The first couple of hours isn’t indicative of the full experience, leaving the opening levels feeling somewhat like a slog. In the beginning hours, it often feels like you’re meandering about with no true purpose in comparison to later events. Those few levels could do with being tighter or sped up to match with the rest of the game, as it slows the experience down & creates a sense of general unevenness with the trajectory of the Knight’s adventure.
Wrap-up
Hollow Knight is an immediate classic. You’ll be rewarded with every second that you spend playing this game, nothing feels wasted or left as an afterthought save for some minor pacing issues. Team Cherry has crafted a tight, responsive 2D side-scroller that deserves your attention & support as it’s truly a modern masterpiece.
Score: Must Buy
Hollow Knight was published & developed by Team Cherry on Xbox One. It was released on September 25th, 2018, for $14.99. A copy was provided for review purposes.

Guns, Gore and Cannoli 2 Review: Not a Game to Fuggedabout

Guns, Gore and Cannoli 2 Review: Not a Game to Fuggedabout

Taking place 16 years after the original game, Guns, Gore and Cannoli 2 brings players to the 1940’s. After the events that happened in the fictional location of Thugstown, players once again take the role of Vincent Cannoli whos being held captive by mafia thugs working for the mysterious Dark Don. Quickly freeing himself from the imprisonment, Vincent works towards finding the mysterious Don and learning what the Don wants with him. Vincent must fight through countless mafia men, zombies and soldiers among other enemies on an adventure across various locales. The game features four-player co-op either local or online. Much like the original game, players start at one end of the level and need to make their way to the other end. The game works as a side-scroller, but some levels do feature verticality that will require Vincent to scale up buildings or mountainous areas.
Thankfully, Vincent’s new maneuverability helps the game feel more polished. Vincent can now double jump, as well as roll. He can also jump once and roll in mid-air which becomes really useful against some enemy fire. Vincent will recover all the weapons he had in the original game over time, as well as pick up a few new weapons relative to the time period. The ability to kick enemies can give you some much-needed space and even knock them into environmental hazards. Various objects around the world can be shot and dropped on your enemy unsuspectingly. Any explosives that hit Vincent can propel him high into the air which makes dropping a rocket on a group of enemies feels really slick. All these new elements make the game a lot of fun.

What I liked:
360 Degree view – When you think about the original Guns, Gore and Cannoli, what is the biggest issue that comes to mind? One of the biggest issues revolved around the camera. In the original game, Vincent was not able to look up or down. He was only allowed to shoot what was on his level to the left or right of him. This was an issue in many areas where the player was required to jump up or down to areas where enemies were present. You weren’t able to kill an enemy till you got on their level, and by then, you’d most likely already had taken damage. This issue is corrected in the second game by giving the player 360-Degree aiming with the right stick. This allows Vincent to be more combative to higher and lower enemies.
Zoomed Out – Yet another issue that the original Guns, Gore and Cannoli had was just how close the camera was to the player. Sure, in the original game there were a lot more close quarters areas, but the problem lied in the fact that enemies were capable of shooting Vincent before they were ever on-screen. It can probably be argued that this helped keep the surprise of just what was ahead of the player, but it had lead to frustrating trial and error in levels from unsuspectingly running into a large group of enemies you’d almost have never seen coming. Guns Gore and Cannoli 2 zooms out the camera angle quite a bit giving the player a larger scope of the area around them. This helps the player see what all is ahead, as well as who or what is coming from behind which leaves the frustrations from the original game trailing in the wind.
Comedic Value – Guns, Gore and Cannoli 2 strives on its simple run and gun mechanics and witty one-liners that come from Vincent and other characters. The game does well to push the funny meter up to 10 this time around by pushing the comedic value of the entire game so far to point break. If the one-liners weren’t enough, the second game pushes to add hilarity with various puns made throughout the game against various enemies and weaponry used. Even actual historical events become a tad absurd, such as World War II’s D-Day where Vincent takes on the entire Nazi army. The game features various references to popular movies and music. All these additions help the game feel like more than a mindless run and gun shooter.

What I didn’t:
Confusing Controls – There are only so many times you can tell yourself that the controls will just take some getting used to. Some functions such as jumping work just as they should, the only oddity being that jump is tied to the left trigger instead of the A button. Other functions such as switching weapons are where the controls start to get confusing. Players need to hold the right bumper and use the right stick to select the weapon from a circular wheel, letting go of the bumper once they’ve made their selection. The game also allows the user to press the right bumper and use the right stick to select their weapon of choice. The menu will only disappear once the player presses the right bumper again. In intense combat situations, mistakingly pressing instead of holding can really mess you up. The game also allows the player to switch weapons by pressing Y, but each press scrolls through the next weapon in the inventory. This method is similar to the original game; however, the X button which scrolled through previous weapons is no longer included.
Too many weapons – The number of weapons Guns, Gore and Cannoli 2 has to offer alongside how confusing it is to cycle through them goes hand-in-hand. There are a total of 13 weapons Vincent can get his hands on. Of course, some are more effective than others. It leaves the player wondering why the game really needed three different pistols or rifles. Taking into consideration the first game, which only had nine total weapons available, sure there were still multiple of the same type of weapon, but they were also a lot easier to navigate between. Some of the new additions are familiar weapons seen during World War II, but it was probably best for some of these weapons to just replace other weapons instead of being stacked on to the arsenal. Surprisingly, the grenades and Molotov cocktails of the original game are missing in the sequel altogether.

Wrap Up:
Guns, Gore and Cannoli 2 does have a few slight issues that shroud an otherwise near-perfect game. The game does well to fix many of the issues that plagued the first game while taking a few steps backward by changing a few aspects that were probably better left untouched. Guns, Gore and Cannoli 2 does well to tell a unique and comedic story all while following suit with the events of the previous game. The game offers a variety of different levels, all which can be completed in a little over three hours on the normal difficulty. Guns, Gore and Cannoli 2 is a game well worth the time invested.
Score: Highly Recommended
Guns, Gore and Cannoli 2 was developed and published by Crazy Monkey Studios. The game released on October 12th, 2018 for $12.99. A copy was provided for review purposes.